taggedrne:

taggedrne:

what can be smooth but also rough ;)))))

endoplasmic reticulum

follow for more cell facts

cracked-dot-com-official:

coelasquid:

fawnbro:

lokicolouredglasses:

fandom-universe:

kungfucarrie:

The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

"Come on, let’s mix it up!" The heart surgeon says.
"B-but we’ve always done it this way!" The other replies, "this is how you replace a heart valve."
"That’s the most dangerous phrase in the human language!" The first surgeon replies haughtily as he inputs a fruit loop into the patient’s heart. "This will be his valve. He will be a fruit loop in a world of Cheerios."


(taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)
This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.

That bullshit heart surgery example doesn’t even make sense though, does that person think that we’re still doing heart surgery the exact same way we’ve always done heart surgery? As if medicine isn’t constantly changing and updating? Wow it’s almost like people are finding excuses to not have to think critically about the world!

You mean we don’t still take people’s brains out and rub them in salt to dispel the devil and cure headaches? I’m pretty sure that’s established medieval protocol, wouldn’t want to mix things up.

thank you for destroying this nerdshit

cracked-dot-com-official:

coelasquid:

fawnbro:

lokicolouredglasses:

fandom-universe:

kungfucarrie:

The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

"Come on, let’s mix it up!" The heart surgeon says.

"B-but we’ve always done it this way!" The other replies, "this is how you replace a heart valve."

"That’s the most dangerous phrase in the human language!" The first surgeon replies haughtily as he inputs a fruit loop into the patient’s heart. "This will be his valve. He will be a fruit loop in a world of Cheerios."

(taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)

This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.

That bullshit heart surgery example doesn’t even make sense though, does that person think that we’re still doing heart surgery the exact same way we’ve always done heart surgery? As if medicine isn’t constantly changing and updating? Wow it’s almost like people are finding excuses to not have to think critically about the world!

You mean we don’t still take people’s brains out and rub them in salt to dispel the devil and cure headaches? I’m pretty sure that’s established medieval protocol, wouldn’t want to mix things up.

thank you for destroying this nerdshit

(Source: uvmsemba)

ratpoet:

 when you say “nonbinary identities don’t exist BECAUSE SCIENCE”

all you’re telling me is that you don’t know what science is

science is a systematic attempt to describe the world. science does not define the world

if you were to go up to a scientist and say “there are things that exist in the word that science does has not yet adequately described, or described at all” 

the scientist would be like “yeah i know, that’s why i still have a job”

(Source: protectcharles)

thatssoscience:

youngnoblewoman:

stunningpicture:

A novel approach to citizen science.

this is brilliant 

I love this idea!

thatssoscience:

youngnoblewoman:

stunningpicture:

A novel approach to citizen science.

this is brilliant 

I love this idea!

socimages:

Nope!
Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.
Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.
Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

Nope!

Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.

Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.

Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

airyairyquitecontrary:


Fantastic news for people who suffer regularly from migraine headaches. The FDA has just approved a wearable electrical stimulation device for sales in the United States — a headband that prevents the onset of migraines when worn for just 20 minutes each day.
A device like this is definitely long overdue. Some 10% of people worldwide suffer from migraines, a condition characterized by intense pulsing or throbbing pain in one area of the head, accompanied by nausea or vomiting and sensitivity to light and sound.
Developed by STX-Med in Beligum, Cefaly is a compact, portable, battery-powered, prescription device. It’s placed at the center of the forehead, just above the eyes, using a self-adhesive electrode. The headband then delivers transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to the trigeminal nerve known to be involved in migraine headaches. The only known noticeable effect is a tingling or massaging sensation where the electrode is applied. It can only be used by people age 18 or older and should be used no more than once per day for 20 minutes. [x]

I appreciate the fact that they got a designer to make it look like a space tiara. They didn’t have to go that extra mile, but they did, because they care.

airyairyquitecontrary:

Fantastic news for people who suffer regularly from migraine headaches. The FDA has just approved a wearable electrical stimulation device for sales in the United States — a headband that prevents the onset of migraines when worn for just 20 minutes each day.

A device like this is definitely long overdue. Some 10% of people worldwide suffer from migraines, a condition characterized by intense pulsing or throbbing pain in one area of the head, accompanied by nausea or vomiting and sensitivity to light and sound.

Developed by STX-Med in Beligum, Cefaly is a compact, portable, battery-powered, prescription device. It’s placed at the center of the forehead, just above the eyes, using a self-adhesive electrode. The headband then delivers transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to the trigeminal nerve known to be involved in migraine headaches. The only known noticeable effect is a tingling or massaging sensation where the electrode is applied. It can only be used by people age 18 or older and should be used no more than once per day for 20 minutes. [x]

I appreciate the fact that they got a designer to make it look like a space tiara. They didn’t have to go that extra mile, but they did, because they care.

(Source: veruca-assault)

ricktimus:

Neil deGrasse Tyson is not impressed with all your sexism.

thedragoninmygarage:

in 2006 the Kansas school board was campaigned to add required labels to textbooks that mention evolution. There have been many parodies on the “Warning, Evolution is only a theory” labels, these are my favourite:)

The one on the top left (first) is the original label that they wanted placed on textbooks.

upgraders:

unclefather:

this is what our tax dollars pay for

good

upgraders:

unclefather:

this is what our tax dollars pay for

good

(Source: ruinleon)

gryphonstars:

arachnescurse:

Today I learned that the Curiosity sang itself ‘Happy Birthday’ on its year anniversary of being on Mars.

All alone.

Hundreds of thousands of miles from anyone or anything.

Guys I am depressed over robots now.

D:

I think the roots of this antagonism to science run very deep. They’re ancient. We see them in Genesis, this first story, this founding myth of ours, in which the first humans are doomed and cursed eternally for asking a question, for partaking of the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge. It’s puzzling that Eden is synonymous with paradise when, if you think about it at all, it’s more like a maximum-security prison with twenty-four hour surveillance. It’s a horrible place. Adam and Eve have no childhood. They awaken full-grown. What is a human being without a childhood? Our long childhood is a critical feature of our species. It differentiates us, to a degree, from most other species. We take a longer time to mature. We depend upon these formative years and the social fabric to learn many of the things we need to know.

scienceyoucanlove:

after-fear:

Overly Honest Methods in science.

The using rodents instead of students one is too true