oliviawhen:

There is nothing I don’t love about the Series of Unfortunate Events universe.

clairedraws:

those kids have the most rotten luck

clairedraws:

those kids have the most rotten luck

When the children first meet Count Olaf and Jim Carrey says, “Wait, give me the line again,” was not actually in the script, it was Carrey staying in character and wanting to try it again, but they kept the cameras rolling and felt it worked the way it happened.

(Source: rickgrimeshappens)

governorodious:

got 99 problems but a cakesniffer ain’t 1

amandarotten:

A couple of book covers for my Illustration Studio. 

This set is Lemony Snicket’s Series of Unfortunate Events


A Series of Unfortunate Events (Adult Covers) by Lemony Snicket
I remember reading an article a while back about the reason Bloomsbury released “adult” covers for Harry Potter over in England. It was due to customer demand that adult readers were a bit embarrassed to be seen reading “children’s books” around town. Thus, Bloomsbury released non-illustrated versions of the covers that had simple photographs and a more subdued color-palette.
So it got me thinking. What other popular children’s series would an adult be a bit embarrassed to be seen reading in public? And I immediately thought of Lemony Snicket’s Series of Unfortunate Events. Not only are they covered in (amazing) illustrations on the outside, but have the extra bonus of being a teeny tiny postcard-sized book, telling those on the subway that yes, you read children’s books, and yes, 200 regular-sized pages is where you max out.
With that in mind, I sought to redesign the series for the self-conscious adult. Using the brilliant photography of Rodney Smith, I ditched the orphans on the cover and instead brought the focus of each to that of the illusive Mr. Snicket, observing the events as they happen, later to be retold in his unique prose. His identity in the stories is always in question, as his relationship with the events is shrouded in mystery. Because of this, he remains hidden from view from the reader, even on the cover.

A Series of Unfortunate Events (Adult Covers) by Lemony Snicket

I remember reading an article a while back about the reason Bloomsbury released “adult” covers for Harry Potter over in England. It was due to customer demand that adult readers were a bit embarrassed to be seen reading “children’s books” around town. Thus, Bloomsbury released non-illustrated versions of the covers that had simple photographs and a more subdued color-palette.

So it got me thinking. What other popular children’s series would an adult be a bit embarrassed to be seen reading in public? And I immediately thought of Lemony Snicket’s Series of Unfortunate Events. Not only are they covered in (amazing) illustrations on the outside, but have the extra bonus of being a teeny tiny postcard-sized book, telling those on the subway that yes, you read children’s books, and yes, 200 regular-sized pages is where you max out.

With that in mind, I sought to redesign the series for the self-conscious adult. Using the brilliant photography of Rodney Smith, I ditched the orphans on the cover and instead brought the focus of each to that of the illusive Mr. Snicket, observing the events as they happen, later to be retold in his unique prose. His identity in the stories is always in question, as his relationship with the events is shrouded in mystery. Because of this, he remains hidden from view from the reader, even on the cover.

(Source: newcover)

I know that having a good vocabulary doesn’t guarantee that I’m a good person,” the boy said. “But it does mean I’ve read a great deal. And in my experience, well-read people are less likely to be evil.

(Source: homerforsure)

bluebirdsofhappyness said: Now I want to read the Series of Unfortunate Events. :3 lol I never did when I was younger, though I enjoyed the movie.


Ughhh that movie. Don’t get me started on the movie. It’s a cute little thing, sure, but it totally 100% does not capture the essence or tone of the books at all. They had Daniel Handler write (I believe) three different scripts. And they didn’t like them. So they fired him. From his own movie. Personally I just think the only way ASOUE could’ve been a truly successful book-to-movie adaptation is if it were animated in a gothic-style type thing. Jim Carrey is not Olaf. Olaf is ridiculous, yes. He keeps a trunk of costumes to parade around in all the time. He wrote a play called The Most Handsome Man in the Entire World for him to star in, and then wrote a sequel: Why I Believe I’ve Become Even More Handsome! But he’s really, really scary too. He tries to marry Violet for her money by staging a play and having a real Justice of the Peace officiate the in-play marriage, forcing Violet to go along with this by locking her baby sister in a cage from the top of a tower. He murders a few of their guardians, he frames someone else for his crimes, he even attempts to murder the Baudelaires. So, if you haven’t read the books, it’s an interesting movie. But if you have, it’s a failure, probably one of the worst. They crammed three novels into one movie and made it “funny.” A Series of Unfortunate Events is wittier than I think it is funny. You should try the books!

I really, really would. I’ll be honest and say I haven’t reread them since I was younger, so I can’t exactly give you the POV of someone older reading them, but every time I see a line or a page from the series, I’m reminded how brilliant I think Daniel Handler (Lemony Snicket) is. I admire A Series of Unfortunate Events so much because you’ve get three heroes, each with different skills, that you get to value and root for. You can miss out on that with a lot of other series because there’s one person whose story is being told—here you have the classic orphan tale, but you’ve got it with three incredibly bright kids who find that they have to rely on each other instead of the adults in their lives.
Really I don’t think the books are for children, though they’re marketed that way. It’s a very isolated coming of age tale about—as someone else so eloquently put it—ethical relativism. The Unfortunate Events books take place in a much smaller timespan than most coming-of-age tales, but they’re still forced to do so much growing up and they’re faced with tougher questions and choices. The series is dark. I mean, just in the first book, there was an underage forced marriage plot! Violet, Klaus, and Sunny are shuffled around between inept adults, hoping that each time they’re going to have someone to trust, but they never do. They led a charmed life and then it was ripped from them and they could only rely on each other. In a lot of other children’s books I’ve read, the charmed life happened when they were too young to remember it, or the adventure starts on the premise of something new and good and hopeful (though they battle difficulties and troubles along the way). Here we start at the worst possible event: your parents have died, you have nothing, and then someone is trying to take what little you have left. I don’t even think the Baudelaire’s care about their money that much (which I also admire), Olaf is just determined to get it in a dark and sinister way.
Here’s what I take away from ASOUE: sometimes good people have to do bad things in order to survive or even to protect more people. And that’s confusing. There’s no clear black-and-white good-and-evil, and Violet and Klaus and Sunny struggle with that because they’re still just kids. And then these books probably have one of my favorite morals ever: those who seek out knowledge, who are always trying to learn more by reading or inventing or attempting new skills: those people are going to be the good people.
On top of all that, I’ve never found anyone that writes like Handler. People have tried (I’m looking at you, Trenton Stewart with your Mysterious Benedict Society) but they haven’t matched it. Personally Daniel Handler’s type of humor is my favorite, an of over-the-top ridiculousness with an undercut of sarcasm, but I think he also hits the nail on the head with heart and hope, too. 
So: TL;DR: yes. Read them. I love them, and I hope you do too, and if you don’t, at least they’re pretty simple books that are fast to get through. I don’t think you’ll regret it. 
Also this post does a good summary of why I love Violet so much: http://basic-eight.tumblr.com/tagged/violet-baudelaire
And also, if you like literary references, these books are chalk full of them. That’s what also makes them my favorite.
ALSO I’M SORRY I COULDN’T SUM THIS UP.

I really, really would. I’ll be honest and say I haven’t reread them since I was younger, so I can’t exactly give you the POV of someone older reading them, but every time I see a line or a page from the series, I’m reminded how brilliant I think Daniel Handler (Lemony Snicket) is. I admire A Series of Unfortunate Events so much because you’ve get three heroes, each with different skills, that you get to value and root for. You can miss out on that with a lot of other series because there’s one person whose story is being told—here you have the classic orphan tale, but you’ve got it with three incredibly bright kids who find that they have to rely on each other instead of the adults in their lives.

Really I don’t think the books are for children, though they’re marketed that way. It’s a very isolated coming of age tale about—as someone else so eloquently put it—ethical relativism. The Unfortunate Events books take place in a much smaller timespan than most coming-of-age tales, but they’re still forced to do so much growing up and they’re faced with tougher questions and choices. The series is dark. I mean, just in the first book, there was an underage forced marriage plot! Violet, Klaus, and Sunny are shuffled around between inept adults, hoping that each time they’re going to have someone to trust, but they never do. They led a charmed life and then it was ripped from them and they could only rely on each other. In a lot of other children’s books I’ve read, the charmed life happened when they were too young to remember it, or the adventure starts on the premise of something new and good and hopeful (though they battle difficulties and troubles along the way). Here we start at the worst possible event: your parents have died, you have nothing, and then someone is trying to take what little you have left. I don’t even think the Baudelaire’s care about their money that much (which I also admire), Olaf is just determined to get it in a dark and sinister way.

Here’s what I take away from ASOUE: sometimes good people have to do bad things in order to survive or even to protect more people. And that’s confusing. There’s no clear black-and-white good-and-evil, and Violet and Klaus and Sunny struggle with that because they’re still just kids. And then these books probably have one of my favorite morals ever: those who seek out knowledge, who are always trying to learn more by reading or inventing or attempting new skills: those people are going to be the good people.

On top of all that, I’ve never found anyone that writes like Handler. People have tried (I’m looking at you, Trenton Stewart with your Mysterious Benedict Society) but they haven’t matched it. Personally Daniel Handler’s type of humor is my favorite, an of over-the-top ridiculousness with an undercut of sarcasm, but I think he also hits the nail on the head with heart and hope, too. 

So: TL;DR: yes. Read them. I love them, and I hope you do too, and if you don’t, at least they’re pretty simple books that are fast to get through. I don’t think you’ll regret it. 

Also this post does a good summary of why I love Violet so much: http://basic-eight.tumblr.com/tagged/violet-baudelaire

And also, if you like literary references, these books are chalk full of them. That’s what also makes them my favorite.

ALSO I’M SORRY I COULDN’T SUM THIS UP.